Internet Marketers, are They Headed for Extinction?

bruce aristeo marketing

bruce aristeo marketing

Are Internet Marketers marketing themselves out of the market, thus becoming extinct?

If you’re old enough, you should remember when the Internet was introduced to the world. Then, shortly after we got used to the directory and file driven GUI, AOL created an application with colored icons and buttons. Finally, the Internet became a term of the past and we were introduced to the WEB.

INTERNET MARKETERS MAKING MILLIONS

With the introduction of the Web, we saw .COM companies emerging with graphic designers and programmers making millions. The word was out, everyone had to have a website! Soon after, people began buying URLs and selling them to the large corporations at an astronomical profit. Ah, the good ‘ol days…

OOPS!

But, what was the end result to millions of people hitching a ride on the programming bandwagon? Well, the programmers began programming applications to build websites, scripts, and web-based apps for those do-it-yourselfers. You no longer needed a programmer when you had the app doing the job. That sounds much like a traditional sci-fi movie, the ones in which humans build computers to do work only to have the computers take over.

MANUAL LABOR

Looking at today’s level of marketing, there is a tremendous amount of manual labor maintaining social media, search engine marketing, keyword research, and yes, we still have website development. The question to ask is, “Where is all this headed?”

My inbox continues to grow exponentially with offers from companies whose product line consists of apps that maintain, monitor, and offer analytics targeting areas that require the most attention. The purpose of these apps are to alleviate manual labor and guesswork. Sound familiar?

THE QUESTION

So, are Internet Marketers marketing themselves out of the market place as programmers were deprogrammed by inventing new ways to ease the burden of manual labor? Comments requested…

On-Page SEO Strategy: Getting Found Online

bruce aristeo

bruce aristeo
On-page SEO is about keywords or key-terms, keyword ranking, and ensuring that your most important terms are found within the content elements of your website. Content elements relate to page structure and include titles, headlines, sub-headlines, body content (text), images, tags and links.

Keyword density relates to the amount of times your most important words are used within the elements, however, overuse of these terms can be as damaging to keyword ranking as failing to use them enough. A good guideline is to keep less than 7 keywords per page, making sure they are the most prominent. Remember, you can populate the page with 1-2 terms on the same page, giving you better keyword ranking in search engine results pages (SERP).

The following tips are examples of on-page SEO done right:

  • Pick a primary terms or two for each page. Search engines use these words to rank and clearly determine what your content is about. Using too many keyword ranking terms in your content will confuse search engines and reduce your importance and the ‘authority’ of your page.
  • Place your key-terms within your heading and sub-heading, as these elements carry more weight with SERP.
  • Use your terms within the body-content (main text) of your page. They must be incorporated in a natural fashion that relates to the information you’re providing in some relevant manner for the best keyword ranking. Stuffing terms out of context for the sake of having them is a no-no, so make them count.
  • Include key-terms in the file names of images (i.e., mykeyword.jpeg), or within the Alt tag option to help ranking.
  • Use your terms within the site URL for better ranking.
  • Develop content for your readers, not search engines. Writing from the perspective of keyword ranking will never achieve the natural flow necessary to engage your site visitors, and defeats the purpose of getting them there in the first place.
  • Create an XML Sitemap for search engines to quickly understand and index the content. Here’s one (of many) free sitemap builders to help you.

Got a favorite SEO tip to share or myth to bust? Leave us a comment!

Off-Page SEO And Inbound Links: The Company You Keep

bruce aristeo

bruce aristeo

Off-page SEO is about building quality inbound links; a network of links from other high-ranking sites that lead back to your website. Just as it is in other areas of business, it’s often ‘who you know’ that matters. Search engines consider the quality, or ‘authority’ of the sites linking back to you, and the more authoritative inbound links you create, the higher you’ll rank.

You might have come across companies that offer link building campaigns, and what they offer seems quite appealing because it will save you lots of time. If you’re interested in having this service performed, please ensure you have an ironclad money-back guarantee. Usually, this service requires months to perform, and you should see a difference in the amount of inbound links to your website.

Check for testimonials, and check the testimonials by contacting them via email or phone. The process for verification is the same as if you were hiring an employee. Always keep in mind that building quality inbound links takes time and effort, but the tips below should get you off and running.

  • Content is king. Create engaging, educational and informative content. When people like your content, chances are they’ll want to share it by linking to it.
  • Submit your website to online directories. Many directories are free and easy to set up.
  • Write guest posts for other popular blogs. Popular blogs are often looking to add quality content, and by building these relationships, you’re also building quality inbound links.
  • Research link-building opportunities with other sites of authority. There are online tools available to help you check the domain and page ranking of the sites you’re trying to build links with.

Have a question or tip regarding Off-Page SEO? We’d love to hear it in our comments section.

Website Design: Making A Good First Impression

bruce aristeo

bruce aristeo

As with any first meeting, your website design says a lot about who you are and the quality of your business. First time visitors quickly (although, often subconsciously) run through a list of qualifiers before deciding if it’s worth their time to get to know you. Some of the questions they may ask themselves include, but are not limited to:

  • Is this a credible business site?
  • Can I trust the information provided?
  • How long has this company been in business?
  • Can I easily navigate to the information I need?
  • Is this site welcoming and engaging …professional?

Studies show that while aesthetics alone may not be the lone factor when it comes to first impressions, bells and whistles that serve little purpose are distracting to consumers. A clean website design that incorporates multimedia where appropriate will often engage a site visitor better than an overly priced, multi-colored site comprised of flashy components.

  • Here’s some additional tips:
  • Color – Pick 2-4 that compliment
  • Animation and music – avoid the unnecessary.
  • Over-crowding – make white space your friend to help reduce clutter.
  • Organization – use easy navigation bars vs. random links. Make it easy for visitors to find great content with as few clicks as possible.
  • Fonts and Layout – choose easy to read font sizes and styles. While headlines and other elements should be larger in size, don’t shout. Layout consistency is key and should remain uniform on each page (with the exception of landing pages).

What do you notice first when you arrive at a website for the first time? What turns you off, or gives you a reason to stay awhile? Leave your comments as part of simple survey of thoughts! Who knows; you might surprise us!

Website Design Navigation; Are You Lost?

Bruce Aristeo Website Design Navigation

Bruce Aristeo Website Design Navigation

One of the most important elements to any website design is ease of navigation; the ability of visitors to find the information they need and thus, keep them on your site as they explore all you have to offer.  Any roadblock, such as requiring multiple clicks to reach their desired information, or plug-in requirements to view your content can send a potential customer away from your website in a hurry.

Still, over and over again we see websites that try to use chic design features as a means to elevate their navigation tools …at their own peril, of course.

Key tips to consider:

  • Simple, clear, structured navigation near the top of your website, as well as within the footer.
  • Include a search box for ease of searching your pages by keywords.
  • When possible, keep your sub-menus no more than 3 levels deep.
  • Limit the number of navigational options on a page
  • Including links to other pages within your body text content encourages further exploration while also boosting your SEO.

Avoid fancy or complicated Java Script and Flash in your navigation, as it often requires a visitor to have updated software and limits the ability of mobile users (at present) to navigate your website. 

Social Media Expert?

Bruce Aristeo Social Media Expert

Bruce Aristeo Social Media ExpertFrom LinkedIn Social Media:

Is there such a thing as a SM Expert?

I know that this is late to post, but I just recently got around to looking at some of my social media discussions. I’ve heard competitors talk about being a Guru, and Expert, and Wizard, and every one of the blog postings I’ve read miss the mark entirely because they’re all the same! I think this discussion states it all in that there is “no such thing as a social media expert.”

Social media is a fluid form

There can be an expert in a particular field of study that remains relatively stable, but in the case of this discussion, the arena of social media is too vast and encompasses countless variables. SM is a fluid form of communication which will never stop, even within specific industries. Take printing companies for example, the industry changes so rapidly that they have a hard enough time maintaining a grip on technology and staying ahead of home printing options such as the ability to print business cards and stationery.

Check out this discussion, see what you think, and think about it the next time you hear someone titled or being titling as a SM expert. You might want to strike up a discussion with them to find out what he/she thinks of the concept.